CO Rules & Regs

Quick Facts - 10/9/2013
  • Amendment 64 to the Colorado Constitution directed the General Assembly to enact legislation governing the cultivation, processing, and sale of industrial hemp.  Legislation adopted in 2013 delegated the responsibility for establishing registration and inspection regulations to the Colorado Department of Agriculture.
  • The new rules, to be published as 8 CCR 1203-23, will sets forth the requirements of registration and inspection. These rules will be adopted and effective by early 2014.  The registration deadline is May 1 of each year, beginning in 2014.
  • Industrial Hemp means a plant of the genus Cannabis and any part of the plant, whether growing or not, containing a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration of no more than three-tenths of one percent (0.3%) on a dry weight basis.
  • Two types of registration will be allowed:  Research and Development (R & D) and Commercial.
    • R & D is limited to 10 acres or less and will be charged a registration fee of $100 plus $5/acre.
    • Commercial registrants are not limited in size of acreage and will be charged a registration fee of $200 plus $1.00/acre.
  • When registering, applicants must provide:
    • contact information
    • maps that include GPS locations of all growing locations and varieties planted
    • affidavits or lab tests showing that the crop planted will produce a THC content of 0.3% or less
  • CDA will select at least one third of registrants each year for field sampling and verification of 0.3% or less THC content.
  • Costs of field sampling and lab testing incurred by the Department will be passed on to the registrant.
    • Fees for field sampling are currently $35/hour and will include drive time, sampling time and any per diem or room charges incurred by the Department’s representative(s).

CDA Statement on Industrial Hemp - May 20, 2013
Colorado Deputy Commissioner of Agriculture Ron Carleton issued a statement concerning industrial hemp and the process for cultivating it in compliance with Amendment 64 and legislation recently enacted by the Colorado General Assembly.
 
“Since passage of Amendment 64, the Department has received numerous inquiries from individuals who are interested in cultivating industrial hemp as a crop. Unfortunately, there is considerable confusion about what both Amendment 64 and legislation approved by the General Assembly, SB13-241, actually did with regard to hemp.
 
“Amendment 64 did not authorize the immediate cultivation of hemp. It instead directed the General Assembly to enact legislation governing the cultivation, processing and sale of industrial hemp. This they have now done,” stated Carleton, in reference to SB13-241. “This legislation delegates to the Department the responsibility for establishing registration and inspection regulations and to have the rules finalized by March 1, 2014. The bill also creates an advisory committee to help the Department in developing the regulations. The measure is now awaiting action by Governor John Hickenlooper.
 
“Once SB13-241 becomes law, we will begin the rulemaking process, working in consultation with the advisory committee. While we will work diligently to complete this process as quickly as possible, it is unlikely that we will have rules setting up a registration and inspection system in place until early 2014.
 
“The General Assembly, with SB13-241, has made it clear that cultivation, for either commercial or research and development purposes, is not authorized unless the prospective grower first registers with the Department. That will not be possible until early 2014 as we do not expect the registration program to be in place before then.”
 
Individuals with questions concerning the upcoming rulemaking process may contact the Colorado Department of Agriculture at (303) 239-4100.

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